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cptindy
Penny Hoarding Member



572 Posts

Posted - 05/07/2010 :  07:50:13  Show Profile Send cptindy a Private Message
I find it odd that with all the technology and advancement today we are building a last minute box. This rapid need to build a safe containment device that is just a box is strange. How is it that if a box is all it may take to contain the leaking oil this thing was not sitting somewhere waiting for the potential day.

I have yet to hear of an official cause to this calamity. Our efforts to consolidate and contain seem last minute and an after thought which is puzzling.

Many odd situations have appeared all at once in a way that I can only translate as pre-designed. The only for-thought that seems to be in place is the control that will be instituted in the name of safety to the ever willing public.

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The Associated Press

Published: May 7, 2010

ON THE GULF OF MEXICO - A mission to the bottom of the sea to try to avert a wider environmental disaster progressed early today as crews said a 100-ton concrete-and-steel box was close to being placed over a blown-out well on the Gulf floor in an unprecedented attempt to capture gushing oil.

Douglas Peake, the first mate of the supply boat that brought the box to the site, confirmed a radio transmission from the nearby vessel lowering the device that said the device would be in position over the well soon.

The transmission said undersea robots were placing buoys around the main oil leak to act as markers to help line up the 40-foot box.

The box was about 4,000 feet underwater before dawn Friday, with another 1,000 feet to go, Coast Guard Petty Officer Shawn Eggert said.

A crane late Thursday lowered the containment vessel designed to collect as much as 85 percent of the oil spewing into the Gulf and funnel it up to a tanker. Eventually the crane would give way to underwater robots that will secure the contraption over the main leak at the bottom, a journey that would take hours.

A steel pipe will be installed between the top of the box and tanker. If all goes well, the whole structure could be operating by Sunday.

"We haven't done this before," said BP spokesman David Nicholas. "It's very complex and we can't guarantee it."

Oil giant BP PLC is in charge of cleaning up the mess. It was leasing the drilling rig Deepwater Horizon that exploded 50 miles out in the Gulf of Mexico, killing 11 workers on April 20 and blowing open the well. It has been spewing an estimated 200,000 gallons a day in the nation's biggest oil spill since the Exxon Valdez disaster in Alaska in 1989.

The quest took on added urgency as oil reached several barrier islands off the Louisiana coast, many of them fragile animal habitats. Several birds were spotted diving into the oily, pinkish-brown water, and dead jellyfish washed up on the uninhabited islands.

"It's all over the place. We hope to get it cleaned up before it moves up the west side of the river," said Dustin Chauvin, a 20-year-old shrimp boat captain from Terrebonne Parish, La. "That's our whole fishing ground. That's our livelihood."

The crew of the semi-submersible drilling vessel Helix Q4000 waited hours longer that expected to hoist the contraption from the deck of the Joe Griffin supply boat because dangerous fumes rising from the oily water on a windless night had delayed the work. Joe Griffin Capt. Demi Shaffer told an Associated Press reporter aboard his boat the fear was that a spark caused by the scrape of metal on metal could cause a fire.

But the crane lifted the containment box from the deck and into the Gulf after 10 p.m. CDT, dark oil clinging to its white sides as it entered the water and disappeared below the surface.

The technology has been used a few times in shallow waters, but never at such extreme depths - 5,000 feet down, where the water pressure is enough to crush a submarine.

The box - which looks a lot like a peaked, 40-foot-high outhouse, especially on the inside, with its rough timber framing - must be accurately positioned over the well, or it could damage the leaking pipe and make the problem worse.

BP spokesman Doug Suttles said he is not concerned about that happening. Underwater robots have been clearing pieces of pipe and other debris near where the box will be placed to avoid complications.

"We do not believe it could make things worse," he said.

Other risks include ice clogs in the pipes - a problem that crews will try to prevent by continuously pumping in warm water and methanol - and the danger of explosion when separating the mix of oil, gas and water that is brought to the surface.

"I'm worried about every part, as you can imagine," said David Clarkson, BP vice president of engineering projects.

If the box works, a second one now being built may be used to deal with a second, smaller leak from the sea floor.

"Hopefully, it will work better than they expect," Peake, said.

Interior Secretary Ken Salazar on Thursday halted all new offshore drilling permits nationwide until at least the end of the month while the government investigates the Gulf spill.

Oil slicks stretched for miles off the Louisiana coast, where desperate efforts were under way to skim, corral and set the petroleum ablaze. People in Mississippi, Alabama and Florida watched in despair.

The dropping of the box is just one of many strategies being pursued to stave off a widespread environmental disaster. BP is drilling sideways into the blown-out well in hopes of plugging it from the bottom. Also, oil company engineers are examining whether the leak could be shut off by sealing it from the top instead.

The technique, called a "top kill," would use a tube to shoot mud and concrete directly into the well's blowout preventer, BP spokesman Bill Salvin said. The process would take two to three weeks, compared with the two to three months needed to drill a relief well.

Just after sunrise Friday, the crew of the Joe Griffin planned to spray clean water from cannons into the oil-filled waters surrounding the rig drilling the relief well. The goal is to divert some of the oil away from the rig because the fumes have been so intense that the crew of the rig has had difficulty working on its deck, which is critical to the effort to drill the well.

"Right now, we are the only boat in the zone equipped to do it," Shaffer said of the water cannons.

The rig drilling the relief well is the Development Driller III, a vessel owned by Transocean, the same company that owned the rig that exploded 17 days ago.

During a visit to Biloxi, Miss., Homeland Security Secretary Janet Napolitano said of the containment vessel: "I hope it works. But we are still proceeding as if it won't. If it does, of course, that will be a major positive development."

"We are facing an evolving situation," she warned. "The possibility remains that the BP oil spill could turn into an unprecedented environmental disaster. The possibility remains that it will be somewhat less."

Meanwhile, a six-member board composed of representatives of the Coast Guard and the federal Minerals Management Service will begin investigating the accident next week.

And a federal judicial panel in Washington has been asked to consolidate at least 65 potential class-action lawsuits claiming economic damage from the spill. Commercial fishermen, business and resort owners, charter boat captains, even would-be vacationers have sued from Texas to Florida, seeking damages that could reach into the billions.

"It's just going to kill us. It's going to destroy us," said Dodie Vegas, who owns a motel and cabins in Grand Isle, La., and has seen 10 guests cancel.



"It is the nature of the human species to reject what is true but unpleasant and to embrace what is obviously false but comforting"

" The average man doesn't want to be free. He wants to be safe."

H.L. Mencken

http://silver-news-today.com/

Edited by - cptindy on 05/07/2010 07:54:49
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jonflyfish
Penny Hoarding Member



USA
693 Posts

Posted - 05/07/2010 :  19:14:03  Show Profile  Send jonflyfish a Yahoo! Message Send jonflyfish a Private Message
I sure hope that this gets resolved and we can move forward. I have a huge BP project that is to begin soon and really don't want it to be canceled if BP puts a freeze on cap ex spending. It's selfish but I hope BP gets "bailed out" just like everyone else LOL

The first panacea for a mismanaged nation is inflation of the currency; second is war. Both bring a temporary (and false) prosperity; both bring a permanent ruin. But both are the refuge of political and economic opportunities.
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NDFARMER
1000+ Penny Miser Member



USA
1197 Posts

Posted - 05/11/2010 :  07:24:17  Show Profile Send NDFARMER a Private Message
BP is already passing the buck saying the oil spill isn't their problem. Gee imagine that.

COPPER - the "poormans" precious metal!!!

SELLING - $100.00 face copper shipped to you for $189.00 machine rolled or bagged - PM me if your interested.
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cptindy
Penny Hoarding Member



572 Posts

Posted - 05/11/2010 :  08:11:41  Show Profile Send cptindy a Private Message
This is an example 20 years after the Exxon Valdez and the ramifications of oil to the environment. An original punitive reward was granted for 5 billion. In 2008 after years of review and delays brought on by big oil the damages settled at 5 million.

As this is only a monetary compensation the example is set that the gulf oil spill will be with us for a long time.

The reality with offshore drilling is that just "one mistake" can ruin the planet for generations and potentially make extinct wildlife that requires a proper stewardship.

This catastrophe should be an example to follow for future decisions.


"It is the nature of the human species to reject what is true but unpleasant and to embrace what is obviously false but comforting"

" The average man doesn't want to be free. He wants to be safe."

H.L. Mencken

http://silver-news-today.com/

Edited by - cptindy on 05/15/2010 09:05:52
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cptindy
Penny Hoarding Member



572 Posts

Posted - 05/15/2010 :  09:02:03  Show Profile Send cptindy a Private Message
Uh, Yeah!

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Notice the amount of oil being discharged into the gulf keeps escalating now being predicted to be anywhere from 5,000 to 100,000 barrels a day. While the total amount estimated to have been released is down to 1.6 million barrels.





"It is the nature of the human species to reject what is true but unpleasant and to embrace what is obviously false but comforting"

" The average man doesn't want to be free. He wants to be safe."

H.L. Mencken

http://silver-news-today.com/

Edited by - cptindy on 05/15/2010 09:07:53
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cptindy
Penny Hoarding Member



572 Posts

Posted - 05/17/2010 :  12:47:43  Show Profile Send cptindy a Private Message
Personally I find the processes being used rather comical in the sense that a multi billion dollar company is scrounging for some form of containment with golf balls and rope. Hoping a siphon tube will relieve some of the disbursement of unknown quantities of oil spewing from the earth. All the while spraying chemicals to hide the actual oil allowing it to blend and churn with yet another unknown result.

(It is not funny but dang is this for real?)


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Jeffrey Collins and Jason Dearen, Associated Press Writers, On Monday May 17, 2010, 12:26 pm EDT

NEW ORLEANS (AP) -- BP said Monday it was siphoning some of the oil spewing into the Gulf of Mexico, but worries escalated about the ooze reaching a major ocean current that could carry it through the Florida Keys and up the East Coast.

BP PLC chief operating officer Doug Suttles said Monday on NBC's "Today" that a mile-long tube was funneling a little more than 42,000 gallons of crude a day from a blown-out well into a tanker ship.

That would be about a fifth of the 210,000 gallons the company and the U.S. Coast Guard have estimated are gushing out each day, though scientists who have studied video of the leak say it could be much bigger and even BP acknowledges there's no way to know for sure how much oil there is.

In the nearly a month since an oil rig called the Deepwater Horizon exploded off the coast of Louisiana, killing 11 workers, BP has made several failed attempts to stop the leak, trying in vain to activate emergency valves and lowering a 100-ton container that got clogged with icy crystals.

Chemicals being sprayed underwater are helping to disperse the oil and keep it from washing ashore in great quantities. But millions of gallons are already in the Gulf, and researchers said that in recent days they have discovered miles-long underwater plumes of oil that could poison and suffocate sea life across the food chain, with damage that could endure for a decade or more.

Tar balls have been sporadically washing up on beaches in several states, including Mississippi, where at least 60 have been found.

Engineers finally got the contraption to siphon the oil working Sunday after several setbacks. BP PLC engineers remotely guiding robot submersibles had worked since Friday to place the tube into a 21-inch pipe nearly a mile below the sea.

Crews will slowly increase how much the tube is collecting over the next few days. They need to move slowly because they don't want too much frigid seawater entering the pipe, which could combine with gases to form the same ice-like crystals that doomed the previous containment effort.

As engineers worked to get a better handle on the spill, a researcher told The Associated Press that computer models show the oil may have already seeped into a powerful water stream known as the loop current, which could propel it into the Atlantic Ocean. A boat is being sent later this week to collect samples and learn more.

"This can't be passed off as 'it's not going to be a problem,'" said William Hogarth, dean of the University of South Florida's College of Marine Science. "This is a very sensitive area. We are concerned with what happens in the Florida Keys."

Hogarth said a computer model shows oil has already entered the loop current, while a second shows the oil is 3 miles from it -- still dangerously close. The models are based on weather, ocean current and spill data from the U.S. Navy and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, among other sources.

Hogarth said it's still too early to know what specific amounts of oil will make it to Florida, or what damage it might do to the sensitive Keys or beaches on Florida's Atlantic coast. He said claims by BP that the oil would be less damaging to the Keys after traveling over hundreds of miles from the spill site were not mollifying.

BP had previously said the tube, if successful, was expected to collect most of the oil gushing from the well. Officials still hope to collect most of it when the tube is working at full capacity.

Once it reaches the tanker, the oil is being separated from the natural gas and sea water. The natural gas is being burned off, while the crude is being sent to oil terminals.

Two setbacks over the weekend illustrate how delicate the effort is. Early Sunday, hours before a steady connection was made, engineers were able to suck a small amount of oil to the tanker, but the tube was dislodged. The previous day, equipment used to insert the tube into the gushing pipe at the ocean floor had to be hauled to the surface for readjustment.

The first chance to choke off the flow for good should come in about a week. Engineers plan to shoot heavy mud into the crippled blowout preventer on top of the well, then permanently entomb the leak in concrete. If that doesn't work, crews also can shoot golf balls and knotted rope into the nooks and crannies of the device to plug it, Wells said.

The final choice to end the leak is a relief well, but it is more than two months from completion.

Top officials in President Barack Obama's administration cautioned that the tube "is not a solution."

"We will not rest until BP permanently seals the wellhead, the spill is cleaned up, and the communities and natural resources of the Gulf Coast are restored and made whole," Secretary of Homeland Security Janet Napolitano and Secretary of the Interior Ken Salazar said in a joint statement.

Meanwhile, scientists warned of the effects of the oil that has already leaked into the Gulf.

Researchers have found more underwater plumes of oil than they can count from the well, said Samantha Joye, a professor of marine sciences at the University of Georgia.

"The discovery of these plumes argues that a lot more oil and gas is coming out of that well every day, and I think everybody has gotten that fact except BP," she said.

The hazards of the plume are twofold. Joye said the oil itself can prove toxic to fish, while vast amounts of oxygen are also being sucked from the water by microbes that eat oil. Dispersants used to fight the oil are also food for the microbes, speeding up the oxygen depletion.

Collins reported from Hammond. Associated Press Writers Michael Kunzelman in New Orleans, Shelia Byrd in Jackson, Miss., and Christine Armario in Miami contributed to this report.

"It is the nature of the human species to reject what is true but unpleasant and to embrace what is obviously false but comforting"

" The average man doesn't want to be free. He wants to be safe."

H.L. Mencken

http://silver-news-today.com/

Edited by - cptindy on 05/17/2010 12:56:49
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El Dee
Penny Hoarding Member



USA
547 Posts

Posted - 05/17/2010 :  15:36:37  Show Profile Send El Dee a Private Message
I think this should be in the tracking thread section.


Trust the government? Ask an Indian.
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cptindy
Penny Hoarding Member



572 Posts

Posted - 05/18/2010 :  08:15:01  Show Profile Send cptindy a Private Message
I found this video and thought wow! Seems simple easy and effectively a green solution as oppossed to the unknown chemicals used now.

What do you think?


"It is the nature of the human species to reject what is true but unpleasant and to embrace what is obviously false but comforting"

" The average man doesn't want to be free. He wants to be safe."

H.L. Mencken

http://silver-news-today.com/
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Kurr
1000+ Penny Miser Member



2906 Posts

Posted - 05/18/2010 :  08:30:53  Show Profile Send Kurr a Private Message
I saw that one too. That is why they will not do it.

I also heard, don't know if it was that video or not, that you can grow oyster mushrooms for food on the straw/oil. The convert hydro carbons to sugars or simple sugars or some such, either way they EAT the oil. Then we eat them!



The silver [is] mine, and the gold [is] mine, saith the LORD of hosts. Hag 2:8 [/b]
He created it. He controls it. He gave it to us for His use. Why did we turn from sound scriptural currency that PROTECTS us?

KJV Bible w/ Strong's Concordance: http://www.blueletterbible.org/
The book of The Hundreds: http://www.land.netonecom.net/tlp/ref/boh/bookOfTheHundreds_v4.1.pdf
The Two Republics: http://www.whitehorsemedia.com/docs/THE_TWO_REPUBLICS.pdf
Good reading: http://ecclesia.org/truth/government.html

A number of people are educated beyond, sometimes way beyond, their intelligence. - Tenbears

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cptindy
Penny Hoarding Member



572 Posts

Posted - 05/22/2010 :  22:37:33  Show Profile Send cptindy a Private Message
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Greg Bluestein, Associated Press Writer, On Saturday May 22, 2010, 3:10 am EDT
ROBERT, La. (AP)

-- Anger grew along the Gulf Coast as an ooze of oil washed into delicate coastal wetlands in Lousiana, with residents questioning the federal government and others wondering how to clean up the monthlong mess that worsens with each day.

"It's difficult to clean up when you haven't stopped the source," said Chris Roberts, a councilman for Jefferson Parish, which stretches from the New Orleans metropolitan area to the coast. "You can scrape it off the beach but it's coming right back."

Roberts surveyed the oil that forced officials to close a public beach on Grand Isle, south of New Orleans, as globs of crude that resembled melted chocolate washed up. Others questioned why BP PLC was still in charge of the response.

"The government should have stepped in and not just taken BP's word," declared Wayne Stone of Marathon, Fla., an avid diver who worries about the spill's effect on the ecosystem.

The government is overseeing the cleanup and response, but the official responsible for the oversight said he understands the discontent.

"If anybody is frustrated with this response, I would tell them their symptoms are normal, because I'm frustrated, too," said Coast Guard Commandant Thad Allen. "Nobody likes to have a feeling that you can't do something about a very big problem."

As simple as it may seem, the law prevents the government from just taking over, Allen said. After the 1989 Exxon Valdez spill in Alaska, Congress dictated that oil companies be responsible for dealing with major accidents -- including paying for all cleanup -- with oversight by federal agencies.

BP, which is in charge of the cleanup, said it will be at least Tuesday before engineers can shoot mud into the blown-out well at the bottom of the Gulf, yet another delay in the effort to stop the oil.

A so-called "top kill" has been tried on land but never 5,000 feet underwater, so scientists and engineers have spent the past week preparing and taking measurements to make sure it will stop the oil that has been spewing into the sea for a month. They originally hoped to try it as early as this weekend.

BP spokesman Tom Mueller said there was no snag in the preparations, but that the company must get equipment in place and finish tests before the procedure can begin.

"It's taking time to get everything set up," he said. "They're taking their time. It's never been done before. We've got to make sure everything is right."

Crews will shoot heavy mud into a crippled piece of equipment atop the well, which started spewing after the drilling rig Deepwater Horizon exploded April 20 off the coast of Louisiana, killing 11 workers. Then engineers will direct cement at the well to permanently stop the oil.

BP, which was leasing the rig and is responsible for the cleanup, has tried and failed several times to halt the oil.

Chief Operating Officer Doug Suttles said Friday that a mile-long tube inserted into the leaking pipe is sucking about 92,400 gallons of oil a day to the surface, a figure much lower than the 210,000 gallons a day the company said the tube was sucking up Thursday. Suttles said the higher number is the most the tube has been sucking up at any one time, while the lower number is the average.

The company has conceded that more oil is leaking than its initial estimate of 210,000 gallons a day total, and a government team is working to get a handle on exactly how much is flowing. Even under the most conservative estimate, about 6 million gallons have leaked so far, more than half the amount spilled by the Exxon Valdez.

Frustrated local and state officials were also waiting for the Army Corps of Engineers to issue permits so they can build sand berms in front of islands and wetlands to act as buffers between the advancing oil and the wetlands.

In a statement Friday, corps spokesman Ken Holder said officials understand the urgency, but possible environmental effects must be evaluated before even an emergency permit can be issued.

Coast Guard Rear Adm. Mary Landry also took BP to task for not responding aggressively enough to oil coming ashore in Terrebonne Parish, La., to the west of the mouth of the Mississippi River.

Public interest in the spill is high -- after lawmakers pressed BP for a live video feed of the leak this week, so many people tried to view it that they crashed the government Web site where it was posted.

BP executives say the only guaranteed solution to stop the leak is a pair of relief wells crews have already started drilling, but the work will not be complete for at least two months.

That makes the stakes even higher for the top kill.

Scientists say there is a chance a misfire could lead to new problems. Ed Overton, a Louisiana State University professor of environmental studies, said the crippled piece of equipment called a blowout preventer could spring a new leak that could spew untold gallons of oil if there's a weak spot that is vulnerable to pressure from the heavy mud.

BP is also developing several other plans in case the top kill doesn't work, including an effort to shoot knotted rope, pieces of tire and other material -- known as a junk shot -- to plug the blowout preventer, which was meant to shut off the oil in case of an accident but did not work.

Associated Press writers Matthew Daly in Washington and Kevin McGill in New Orleans contributed to this report.

"It is the nature of the human species to reject what is true but unpleasant and to embrace what is obviously false but comforting"

" The average man doesn't want to be free. He wants to be safe."

H.L. Mencken

http://silver-news-today.com/
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redneck
1000+ Penny Miser Member



1273 Posts

Posted - 05/28/2010 :  07:59:25  Show Profile Send redneck a Private Message
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cptindy
Penny Hoarding Member



572 Posts

Posted - 05/28/2010 :  21:25:11  Show Profile Send cptindy a Private Message
The whole situation is pathetic! It represents the extreme ineptitude of those in responsible positions in corporations and government. This situation is no different to me than the complete mismanagement of the financial system and reflects a greed over all else mentality. Those reaping profits for years are in a CYA tailspin that has now impacted not just civilization but Mother nature herself.

If there is obviously no one watching the ball on our economics and now our coast, then every large interest is managing the exact same way, with no concern about anything more than the money that can be slid daily into their pockets. Completely neglecting any possibility that there may be repercussion to any and all activity.

I am not "anti" to many things, until it is revealed that safety to our lives and planet are taken for granted simply to make the greedy wealthier. How much is enough? HOW MANY SITUATIONS LIKE THESE HAVE TO HAPPEN BEFORE WE GET A CLUE?

I hate to say it but maybe everyone in this country should sit their as@ on the couch for a week. Don't go anywhere, don't buy anything, just sit there and spend time reflecting on life and what is important. Stop all currency from flowing long enough to wake these friggin idiots up!

In order for the beast to live it needs currency, without a constant flow it is helpless. Period!

Sorry for the rant...


"It is the nature of the human species to reject what is true but unpleasant and to embrace what is obviously false but comforting"

" The average man doesn't want to be free. He wants to be safe."

H.L. Mencken

http://silver-news-today.com/
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slickeast
1000+ Penny Miser Member



USA
2533 Posts

Posted - 05/28/2010 :  22:29:59  Show Profile Send slickeast a Private Message
quote:
Originally posted by cptindy

I found this video and thought wow! Seems simple easy and effectively a green solution as oppossed to the unknown chemicals used now.

What do you think?






Looks simple enough, but since the gooberment didn't come up with the idea, it won't be used.

You don't have to be the BEST you just have to be.......SLICK

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Kurr
1000+ Penny Miser Member



2906 Posts

Posted - 05/28/2010 :  22:44:09  Show Profile Send Kurr a Private Message
They're gonna make a killing on this.

They WANT IT BIGGER.

How many enviromental cleanup companies will be formed? New jobs created? New IPO's? Derivitaves? Looks like a swell place to dump BILLIONS TRILLIONS in "new money".

Watch the no bid contracts fly. I think I heard Haliburton JUST bought into a big "Oil Spill Cleanup Company" or some such a week before the spill. Amazing timing. Like goldman shorting the gulf rigs, right before.

Problem/Reaction/Solution

It works for them on SO many levels. Anybody want to look into enviromental cleanup sector and see what the stocks been doing?

We gonna have a HUGE recovery on paper. Real life ain't going to be fun. I am hearing estimates of worst case scenario of 162,000 barrels a day or 6.8 million gallons a day.


The silver [is] mine, and the gold [is] mine, saith the LORD of hosts. Hag 2:8 [/b]
He created it. He controls it. He gave it to us for His use. Why did we turn from sound scriptural currency that PROTECTS us?

KJV Bible w/ Strong's Concordance: http://www.blueletterbible.org/
The book of The Hundreds: http://www.land.netonecom.net/tlp/ref/boh/bookOfTheHundreds_v4.1.pdf
The Two Republics: http://www.whitehorsemedia.com/docs/THE_TWO_REPUBLICS.pdf
Good reading: http://ecclesia.org/truth/government.html

A number of people are educated beyond, sometimes way beyond, their intelligence. - Tenbears


Edited by - Kurr on 05/28/2010 22:45:16
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jonflyfish
Penny Hoarding Member



USA
693 Posts

Posted - 05/29/2010 :  08:56:53  Show Profile  Send jonflyfish a Yahoo! Message Send jonflyfish a Private Message
It's an accident that occurred with highly volatile substances that we are addicted to. It happened at extreme depth. Nothing is perfect and it is extremely difficult to deal with this issue at such depth and pressure. If it was as simple as popping a hole in the ground in West Texas and let the substance that you are addicted to come gushing to your everyday needs then it would be done but it can't. Cheap easy oil is gone but your addiction to it has grown. It has to come from somewhere. The deeper and more complex the wells have to be to meet your addiction, the riskier it becomes. If you don't like it then the simple solution is to stop using ALL forms of petroleum based products. Imagine what exactly that entails(and don't exclude your keyboard either).

The first panacea for a mismanaged nation is inflation of the currency; second is war. Both bring a temporary (and false) prosperity; both bring a permanent ruin. But both are the refuge of political and economic opportunities.
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cptindy
Penny Hoarding Member



572 Posts

Posted - 05/29/2010 :  09:06:41  Show Profile Send cptindy a Private Message
I can appreciate oil and all of its uses.

My concern is not in the consumption as much as the non preparation for a possible FUBAR that seems to have been completely overlooked. I would simply assume a company that is this large in an industry with so much regulation would have a plan for such an occasion.

I am not saying no oil, I am saying with 30 billion dollars profits every quarter maybe take some of that and use it for just in case we have a problem lets "be prepared".

I am an ex scout it is our motto "Be Prepared".

"It is the nature of the human species to reject what is true but unpleasant and to embrace what is obviously false but comforting"

" The average man doesn't want to be free. He wants to be safe."

H.L. Mencken

http://silver-news-today.com/
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Bluegill
1000+ Penny Miser Member



USA
1964 Posts

Posted - 05/29/2010 :  09:51:05  Show Profile Send Bluegill a Private Message
quote:
Originally posted by Bluegill

My spidey senses tell me there is something not quite right here. Maybe this "accident" wasn't really an accident... This incident does help some groups whose political agendas have been stalling as of late. Not like it would be the first time...



More so than ever, I firmly believe this "accident" is anything but. My only remaining question. Is this going to be used as a diversion for the coming economic troubles, or will it be used as the cause?

Kurr, I think you are more on track than you may realize, and most sheep want to admit to.

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jonflyfish
Penny Hoarding Member



USA
693 Posts

Posted - 05/29/2010 :  14:48:07  Show Profile  Send jonflyfish a Yahoo! Message Send jonflyfish a Private Message
I think the fundamental underlying problem is with the unintended consequences of exploration and production that is being driven into new frontiers due to the lack of easy cheap oil. As unfortunate as the Deepwater Horizon accident is, it should serve as a reminder that when you deal with fire, you run the risk of getting burned. Crude oil is nasty stuff. The US needs it as much as food and water. The only way to eliminate the risk of environmental accidents is to eliminate all demand for crude oil. Simply put, all we need to do is agree to revert back to the stone ages.

The first panacea for a mismanaged nation is inflation of the currency; second is war. Both bring a temporary (and false) prosperity; both bring a permanent ruin. But both are the refuge of political and economic opportunities.

Edited by - jonflyfish on 05/29/2010 14:49:28
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thogey
1000+ Penny Miser Member



USA
1617 Posts

Posted - 05/29/2010 :  17:55:33  Show Profile Send thogey a Private Message
I bet a small (15 KT) nuke would do the trick.

It's so far down and out to sea I just don't see the downside.

The topkill thing failed. It seems like this could go on for years.

Come to the new and improved realcent: http://realcent.org

Edited by - thogey on 05/29/2010 17:55:58
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Neckro
1000+ Penny Miser Member



Saudi Arabia
2080 Posts

Posted - 05/29/2010 :  18:05:38  Show Profile  Send Neckro an AOL message  Click to see Neckro's MSN Messenger address  Send Neckro a Yahoo! Message Send Neckro a Private Message
They want the ocean to become all oil. :D It's easier to gather then.

Trolling is an art.
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NDFARMER
1000+ Penny Miser Member



USA
1197 Posts

Posted - 05/29/2010 :  19:01:11  Show Profile Send NDFARMER a Private Message
As I said before that no one can begin to know the magnitude of this oil spill. Economically and environmentally? They say the cost of the spill is at a billion dollars now but this is still in the beginning stages. Just think what will happen latter is summer when a hurricane blows all that oil into a few major cities along the gulf coast. How is BP going to pay for all the lost revenue to the fishing industry, tourism, loss of value to beach front property from Texas to Florida? Plus the cost of clean up that will take years? The answer is they won't. It will be us the good old American tax payer getting stuck with the bill again.

COPPER - the "poormans" precious metal!!!

SELLING - $100.00 face copper shipped to you for $189.00 machine rolled or bagged - PM me if your interested.
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hobo finds
Penny Hoarding Member



838 Posts

Posted - 05/29/2010 :  21:24:38  Show Profile Send hobo finds a Private Message
If thay can run lights, cameras and robots that far down they should be able to come up with something to stop this! WTF
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Kurr
1000+ Penny Miser Member



2906 Posts

Posted - 05/29/2010 :  21:56:24  Show Profile Send Kurr a Private Message
See my last post up there.


The silver [is] mine, and the gold [is] mine, saith the LORD of hosts. Hag 2:8 [/b]
He created it. He controls it. He gave it to us for His use. Why did we turn from sound scriptural currency that PROTECTS us?

KJV Bible w/ Strong's Concordance: http://www.blueletterbible.org/
The book of The Hundreds: http://www.land.netonecom.net/tlp/ref/boh/bookOfTheHundreds_v4.1.pdf
The Two Republics: http://www.whitehorsemedia.com/docs/THE_TWO_REPUBLICS.pdf
Good reading: http://ecclesia.org/truth/government.html

A number of people are educated beyond, sometimes way beyond, their intelligence. - Tenbears

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thogey
1000+ Penny Miser Member



USA
1617 Posts

Posted - 05/29/2010 :  22:11:10  Show Profile Send thogey a Private Message
Very serious problem.

I don't think you guys are considering the diffuculty of working under that much barometric pressure.

It's like trying to plug a volcano at 325 atmospheres of water pressure.

I don't understand how this can be fixed.

A nuke could seal that SOB solid shut!

Come to the new and improved realcent: http://realcent.org
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Kurr
1000+ Penny Miser Member



2906 Posts

Posted - 05/29/2010 :  22:16:16  Show Profile Send Kurr a Private Message
A nuke could also create a tsunami that would push all that water and oil inland, and devastate wetlands, aquafers, cities, etc etc.

Also consider after all that oil is washed up on land, 1 wildfire could set it all ablaze.


The silver [is] mine, and the gold [is] mine, saith the LORD of hosts. Hag 2:8 [/b]
He created it. He controls it. He gave it to us for His use. Why did we turn from sound scriptural currency that PROTECTS us?

KJV Bible w/ Strong's Concordance: http://www.blueletterbible.org/
The book of The Hundreds: http://www.land.netonecom.net/tlp/ref/boh/bookOfTheHundreds_v4.1.pdf
The Two Republics: http://www.whitehorsemedia.com/docs/THE_TWO_REPUBLICS.pdf
Good reading: http://ecclesia.org/truth/government.html

A number of people are educated beyond, sometimes way beyond, their intelligence. - Tenbears

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